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The Daily Iowan

The independent newspaper of the University of Iowa community since 1868

The Daily Iowan

The independent newspaper of the University of Iowa community since 1868

The Daily Iowan

Review | Future and Metro Boomin’s newest album has its moments, but is too bloated

Two of the most iconic minds of 2010’s hip hop can’t match their previous collaborations on their new album, “WE DON’T TRUST YOU.”
iStock.
iStock.

Future and Metro Boomin have become two of the biggest names in hip-hop over the past decade. They boast numerous classic tracks and projects together.

Sadly, however, the same couldn’t be said in 2024. The artist’s new album “We Don’t Trust You,” released on March 22, wasn’t anything to write home about.

The album opens with a smooth, dimly lit groove from Metro, while Future lays the foundation for the cutthroat attitude of the record. From the very beginning, this album is more or less exactly what we expected from the two in both sonic and
lyrical content.

Naturally, Future’s lyrics brought subjects of sex, drugs, all the spoils of wealth, and his quintessential voice at the center of it all. Metro’s production was dense in dark, sample-heavy beats, complimented by various strings, horns, and booms — but not punchy 808s.

I found the featured artists to be one of the album’s highlights. First up was the Weeknd on “Young Metro,” and his unique voice was beautifully tucked within the instruments, which added a tasteful texture to the song.

Later, the one and only Kendrick Lamar joined as a feature on “Like That.”

In all the online discussions I have seen about this album since its release, I would estimate over 90 percent are related to this feature. Lamar’s appearance alone was a surprise, but his throwing shots at J. Cole and Drake over a fiery flow was an even bigger one, given his publicly tame demeanor.

Unfortunately, there were a handful of moments in the album when I was desperate for it to take a different direction. The album could have done without around half its songs, especially “Fried,” “Claustrophobic,” and “GTA.”  I must admit, about halfway through the album, I started doing Sporcle quizzes.

At its best, “WE DON’T TRUST YOU” is catchy, ominous, and rich. At its worst, it’s dragging, bloated, and repetitive.

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About the Contributor
Evan Weidl, Opinions Editor
he/him/his
Evan Weidl is a senior majoring in political science. He previously worked in the opinions section as a columnist.