Police probe Quad trophy theft

Construction+cranes+overlook+Quadrangle+Hall+on+Tuesday%2C+Feb.+17%2C+2015.+Quad+was+built+in+1920+and+was+used+as+a+barracks+during+World+War+I+before+housing+students.+%28The+Daily+Iowan%2FMikaela+Parrick%29

Construction cranes overlook Quadrangle Hall on Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2015. Quad was built in 1920 and was used as a barracks during World War I before housing students. (The Daily Iowan/Mikaela Parrick)

 

Police are investigating the theft of two historic trophies from Quadrangle Hall’s lounge area after staff noticed them missing Tuesday night.

The value of the trophies is only an estimate, Quadrangle officials said, though the police report puts the value of one trophy at $500 and the other at $250. One of the trophies is known to be from 1930 and related to athletics; the age of the other is not known at this time.

There have been inventory checks in the residence hall as a means to preserve what is in the building in hopes to display items in nearby facilities once Quadrangle is demolished after the spring semester.

Built in 1925, Quad is the oldest dormitory on the UI campus and also one incoming students were least likely to see on a campus tour. In 2015, the New York Times named Quad as one of the worst dorms in the country because of its “nonexistent” water pressure, frequent cockroach sightings, and a lingering mildew smell.

This may have brought attention to the case, a secretary said, who would not be quoted without prior approval from administration.

Kate Fitzgerald, an interim hall coordinator of the building, said to her knowledge, one trophy is made of brass with a wood base and pertains to athletics. The makeup of the other one is unknown, but she said it was gold colored.

She said that the trophies may be of sentimental value, but that was no excuse to have them taken away from future students at the UI.

In the lounge on Wednesday, UI police officers noted fingerprints probably couldn’t be pulled from wood from the case and that there would be too many fingerprints on the glass to look for relevant evidence.

Officers said a lock on the bottom of the cabinet was faulty The police were called sometime Tuesday after the trophies were noticed missing.

Fitzgerald said the crime would probably not be noticed if the inventory wasn’t taking place.

Police suggested Quad staff look on Twitter and for pictures posted on social media.

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