Bock: I’m a White Sox fan, not a Chicago Baseball fan

The Chicago Cubs may be a feel-good story, but that doesn’t stop one Chicago White Sox fan from rooting against them, even with his Chicago ties.

FILE - (Joseph Cress/The Daily Iowan)

FILE – (Joseph Cress/The Daily Iowan)

Sean Bock, [email protected]

In Chicago, you’re either a White Sox fan or Cub fan. If people say they like both teams, well, they’re not a true fan of either club.

I was born and raised a Chicago White Sox fan. My grandpa and dad passed down their South Side allegiance to me, and through thick and thin, I’ve been proud to call myself a die-hard fan.

So when the White Sox won the city’s first World Series since 1917 in 2005, it was one of the best days of my life. Where I come from, half of the population is South Siders, and the other half is North Siders.

For 11 years, whenever I would get into an argument with a Cub fan, I’d always win the fight by saying, “Let me know when you guys win a World Series.”

That phrase worked every time, but one day it didn’t.

During the 2016 MLB season, the Cubs were unbeatable. But deep down, I thought there was no way they could pull off a championship run. All my life I heard Cub fans repeating, “There’s always next year.”

RELATED: Cubs, finally, break out of disappointment

But this time, next year was this year.

Constant blaming is a Cubs’ fan trademark. Whether it be the goat, the black cat, or Steve Bartman, there’s always an excuse Cub fans use to cover up their failure.

Throughout the whole 2016 MLB postseason, I became the No. 1 supporter of whatever ball club the Cubs were going up against.

When my friends asked me whether I’d be cheering for the Cubs last postseason, they were appalled by my answer of no.

As well all know, the Cubs won the 2016 World Series in seven games, ending the longest championship drought in sports. To be honest with you, that night was one of the worst of my life.

During the run, I would get hate from Cub fans because I rooted for them to lose. I heard a lot of stupid reasons I should cheer on my beloved team’s archrival, but arguably the craziest one was: “Why aren’t you cheering for the Cubs? If you were a true Chicagoan, you’d like them to win.”

It wasn’t only Cub fans who would say something that would make me lose brain cells. White Sox “fans” also blurted out things that made me cringe.

For example, “I’m a Chicago baseball fan, so if one team is doing well, I’ll cheer for them because I love Chicago baseball.”

When the 2017 playoff field was set, a couple of buddies and I changed our Twitter names to “NatsFan(First name)” to show our support in the NLDS series against the Cubs.

Petty, I know, but also something that needed to be done.

Growing up a Sox fan, I was never taught to hate the Cubs; I think it’s just something that comes with being a follower of the White Sox.

RELATED: The Chicago Cubs, a family affair

I remember being the 2006 Crosstown Classic Game in which White Sox catcher AJ Pierzynski ran into Cubs catcher Michael Barrett when Pierzynski was crossing home plate to score a run.

Tempers started to flare and hands were thrown ultimately, resulting in a bench-clearing brawl. Not only were the players getting into it, but fans sitting near us also exchanged words and blows, and security had to be called.

That’s when I first realized the significance of the rivalry.

One thing all Chicago natives can agree on is the city is one of the best places in the world. But when it comes to baseball, it’s either one or the other.

Though the White Sox rebuildng is two or three more years away until we can officially call them contenders again, it’s only right I continue to cheer against the hated North Siders.

Look at it this way, Hawkeye fans: If Iowa State was playing for a national championship, would you cheer for or against your in-state rival Cyclones?

Yep, that’s what I thought.

Facebook Comments