The Daily Iowan

Reynolds set to sign fetal-heartbeat bill

Iowa+Gov.+Kim+Reynolds+speaks+while+a+portrait+of+President+Donald+Trump+hangs+above+her+during+her+first+Condition+of+the+State+address+in+the+Iowa+State+Capitol+in+Des+Moines+on+Tuesday%2C+Jan.+9%2C+2018.+Reynolds+took+over+the+governor+office+in+May+of+2017.+
Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds speaks while a portrait of President Donald Trump hangs above her during her first Condition of the State address in the Iowa State Capitol in Des Moines on Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018. Reynolds took over the governor office in May of 2017.

Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds speaks while a portrait of President Donald Trump hangs above her during her first Condition of the State address in the Iowa State Capitol in Des Moines on Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018. Reynolds took over the governor office in May of 2017.

Joseph Cress

Joseph Cress

Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds speaks while a portrait of President Donald Trump hangs above her during her first Condition of the State address in the Iowa State Capitol in Des Moines on Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018. Reynolds took over the governor office in May of 2017.


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Gov. Kim Reynolds will sign the fetal heartbeat bill, Senate File 359 at 3 p.m. May 4 in the Governor’s Office in Des Moines, according to a press release from the office.

The bill passed early on the morning of May 2 in the Senate on a 29-17 vote and in the 51-46 vote in the House. It would require physicians to perform ultrasound tests to detect fetal heartbeats. If one is found, the physician would not be able to perform an abortion.

After the passage of amendments, the bill would allow exceptions to the law in the case of rape, incest, or “severe fetal anomaly.”

RELATED: Fetal-heartbeat bill heads to Reynolds’ desk — what happens next?

However, the bill could face challenges in the courts. The Daily Iowan previously reported that University of Iowa constitutional-law Professor Paul Gowder said the bill will almost certainly not survive a court challenge.

“The reason the U.S. Supreme Court would be unlikely to take it is because it’s an easy case to strike down,” Gowder said. “That is, under previous Supreme Court precedents, this kind of bill is clearly not constitutional.”

— Emily Wangen

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