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Spotlight Iowa City: Attorney by day, boxing fanatic by night

BY AMY TIFFANY | SEPTEMBER 02, 2010 7:20 AM

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Adam Pollack possesses many titles: boxing trainer, referee, judge, historian, writer and publisher, and head of the USA Judicial Boxing Committee.

Oh yeah, and practicing attorney.

While the former boxer's position as an attorney pays the bills, his passion and love for boxing puts fire in his eyes.

His house? Filled with bookcases double-stacked full of boxing films. Tyson, Holyfield, Chavez, Louis, to name a few.

His wife, Emily Klinefelter, is also a professional boxer.

Pollack has thoroughly analyzed and digested numerous boxing films. His collection dates back to 1894, but his boxing knowledge, interest, commitment, and involvement knows no boundaries.

What started out as boxing in a local club during high school and for recreation during his undergraduate years at the University of California-Santa Barbara has turned into a multitude of boxing endeavors.

His undergrad degree, film studies, has come in handy.

He is one to watch and study a good fight: "I'm a huge film buff."

After he finished his degree in 1995, Pollack moved across the country to attend law school at the University of Iowa. He graduated in 1998 with high distinction. He practiced law in Los Angeles for two years but moved back to the slower pace of Iowa City in 2000.

"The people in Iowa are very friendly," he said. "It has a nice small-town environment. It just suits me."

The 38-year-old Pollack has been the owner of ICOR boxing club in Iowa City since 2000, where he has trained Katy and Emily Klinefelter for 10 years.

Each credited everything she knows about boxing and its history to Pollack's teaching.

"I don't think any other coach would give you as much time and attention," Emily Klinefelter said.

He is a boxing promoter in Iowa City. He has been the head of the USA Judicial Boxing Committee since 2007. He referees and judges amateur boxing in the state of Iowa.

He is a boxing historian, who has written and published four books about heavyweight boxers — his specialty — and has a fifth book coming out titled In the Ring With Marvin Hart published by his own company, Win by KO Publications, no later than October, Pollack said.

"If it's boxing-related, I'm willing to try it," he said.

After studying thousands of fights, he has the ability to understand and read boxers, part of the reason he is such a good teacher of the sport. He can pick up on "little subtle cues" of boxers, their strengths and weaknesses based on their history and style.

To Pollack, a boxer's style is what he or she does in defensive openings, what punches he or she throws, how he or she moves, and what he or she does with the hands, head, and body. He enjoys the poetic beauty of boxing — the analysis of the movements. He tells his boxers to be poker players, even when they're hurt.

"It's just always been a passion for so many years," he said. "It's something I appreciate and I've come to understand it, I enjoy all aspects of the game."

With a full plate offamily, friends, work, and boxing, one might think he gets a little overwhelmed.

"It's not as crazy as it sounds," Pollack said.


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